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SSA Blog

Welcome to the SSA Blog! This is a place to view current news and events concerning Silver Springs. SSA members are encouraged to join in the conversation by submitting comments below the main posts. 


  • Tuesday, January 21, 2014 4:53 PM | Deleted user
    Sign On To Save Our Water! 
    Published by Ocala Star Banner, Page A06, Opinion
    If there is one thing all Floridians should be able to agree on, it is that our water supply is being threatened by pollution and overpumping, and if we all do not start working together to stop both, it will be both environmentally and economically devastating to our state. 

    The problem over the years has not been not finding agreement on the point but stirring action to bring about change. That time may have arrived. 

    Across the state on Wednesday, the Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration Campaign will kick off with the signing by elected officials and everyday citizens of a petition calling for action. The goal of the campaign is to gather at least 100,000 signatures undefined hopefully many more undefined by Feb. 18 to show unified and widespread concern for protecting our waterways and water supply from overuse and pollution. 

    The declaration specifically identifies Floridians’ rights to clean drinking water, protection from pollution, knowledge of the sources of pollution and safe public waterways. It also cites our responsibility to do what we can to stop pollution, protect our water from overconsumption and privatization and ensure clean water for generations to come. 

    In short, it calls for the embracing of a new water ethic that accentuates the long-term value, both environmentally and economically, of a clean and plentiful water supply. And it will take all Floridians to achieve that goal. 

    “The new vision and new water ethic will be developed only when we can agree to stop pointing fingers and begin to work together to solve our water problems,” wrote Lucinda Faulkner Merritt, a member of the Planning Committee for Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration. “Elected officials, water managers, agriculturalists, power suppliers, business and industry leaders, homeowners and homeowners’ associations, engineers, builders, inventors and innovators ... all have parts to play.” 

    Oddly, the need to stop the degradation and diminishment of our water supply and our surface waters has been long recognized in Florida’s communities. There is seldom opposition to efforts to make our springs, lakes and rivers cleaner. There is rarely any resistance to the notion that water permits must be curbed to protect our groundwater supply. 

    The message seems to get lost in Tallahassee, though, where state water policy is made. That is the target of the Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration Campaign undefined our lawmakers and governor. 

    The good news is there is positive movement in the state Senate, in particular, and some encouraging words coming out of the House leadership that suggests they are beginning to acknowledge the breadth and depth of Florida’s water woes. Now, if Floridians, and especially those of us in Marion County, which has been ground zero for so many water battles, can send an unmistakable message that we are unified on this issue, maybe, just maybe, we will see some real action, some real reform to protect our water. 

    Sign the declaration. It costs nothing. It commits you to nothing, except your desire to save and protect Florida’s invaluable water. 

    To sign the declaration go online to wewantcleanwater.com undefined or google “Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration.” 
  • Tuesday, January 21, 2014 3:28 PM | Deleted user

    Ocala Star-Banner 01/21/2014, Page A06

     

    IN OUR OPINION 

    Sign on to save our water 
    I
    f there is one thing all Floridians should be able to agree on, it is that our water supply is being threatened by pollution and overpumping, and if we all do not start working together to stop both, it will be both environmentally and economically devastating to our state. 

    The problem over the years has not been not finding agreement on the point but stirring action to bring about change. That time may have arrived. 

    Across the state on Wednesday, the Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration Campaign will kick off with the signing by elected officials and everyday citizens of a petition calling for action. The goal of the campaign is to gather at least 100,000 signatures undefined hopefully many more undefined by Feb. 18 to show unified and widespread concern for protecting our waterways and water supply from overuse and pollution. 

    The declaration specifically identifies Floridians’ rights to clean drinking water, protection from pollution, knowledge of the sources of pollution and safe public waterways. It also cites our responsibility to do what we can to stop pollution, protect our water from overconsumption and privatization and ensure clean water for generations to come. 

    In short, it calls for the embracing of a new water ethic that accentuates the long-term value, both environmentally and economically, of a clean and plentiful water supply. And it will take all Floridians to achieve that goal. 

    “The new vision and new water ethic will be developed only when we can agree to stop pointing fingers and begin to work together to solve our water problems,” wrote Lucinda Faulkner Merritt, a member of the Planning Committee for Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration. “Elected officials, water managers, agriculturalists, power suppliers, business and industry leaders, homeowners and homeowners’ associations, engineers, builders, inventors and innovators ... all have parts to play.” 

    Oddly, the need to stop the degradation and diminishment of our water supply and our surface waters has been long recognized in Florida’s communities. There is seldom opposition to efforts to make our springs, lakes and rivers cleaner. There is rarely any resistance to the notion that water permits must be curbed to protect our groundwater supply. 

    The message seems to get lost in Tallahassee, though, where state water policy is made. That is the target of the Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration Campaign undefined our lawmakers and governor. 

    The good news is there is positive movement in the state Senate, in particular, and some encouraging words coming out of the House leadership that suggests they are beginning to acknowledge the breadth and depth of Florida’s water woes. Now, if Floridians, and especially those of us in Marion County, which has been ground zero for so many water battles, can send an unmistakable message that we are unified on this issue, maybe, just maybe, we will see some real action, some real reform to protect our water. 

    Sign the declaration. It costs nothing. It commits you to nothing, except your desire to save and protect Florida’s invaluable water. 

    To sign the declaration go online to wewantcleanwater.com undefined or google “Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration.” 


  • Sunday, January 19, 2014 11:12 AM | Deleted user
    This Wednesday January 22, 2014 at 11:00 AM at the Marion County Commission office, 601 SE 25th Ave., Ocala 34471, We need YOU there in person to support the Clean Water Declaration!! Show your support!!

    The Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration is a positive vision to inspire people to work together to create a new water ethic, find solutions to Florida’s water quality and quantity problems and send a clear message to our water managers that the people of Florida demand clean water. 

    From North Florida’s renowned freshwater springs to South Florida’s Everglades and coral reefs, our state is blessed with countless watery wonders. Today many of these wonders are dying – either choked by pollution and toxic algae or drying up because of over-consumption of water, or both. We know the problems that are facing our waters and we know that the longer we wait to fix these problems, the more expensive the fixes will be. Now is the time to act because we, our children, and our grandchildren deserve better. 

    The Floridians’ Clean Water Declaration Campaign is a collaborative effort driven by dozens of civic and environmental organizations from around the state. We are coming together to create a force for change – a change in the water policies of the state of Florida. By sharing ideas and resources across stakeholder lines and watersheds, we will be stronger – stronger together to command our right to clean water. For more information click here!
  • Saturday, January 04, 2014 4:19 PM | Deleted user
    Ocala Star-Banner 01/03/2014, Page A06

    IN OUR OPINION 

    The water reality
     
    T
    he latest word on our water supply is hardly news but worth noting nonetheless. The St. 

    Johns River Water Management District is projecting the 18 counties that make up the district undefined including Marion undefined will tap out their groundwater supply by 2035. When that happens, other means will have to be found to meet the shortfall that is forecast to be somewhere around 256 million gallons a day. 

    What is welcome in the district’s latest watersupply report is that for the first time officials are talking seriously about the need for conservation measures. We and others have long advocated strict conservation measures and widespread water reuse programs similar to those implemented in the Tampa Bay region, where daily per capita water use is about half what it is in the St. Johns district. 

    Conservation, however, will not be enough, according to the water managers. No, even the best conservation scenario will leave the district, which includes big water users Orlando and Jacksonville, about 40 million gallons short, and probably much more. 

    So the district is looking at greater use of underground storage facilities, aquifer recharge, brackish groundwater from coastal areas and, of course, surface water, notably the Ocklawaha and St. Johns rivers. Desalination is also mentioned, but it is not an option the district has ever been warm to because of its cost. 

    Yet, while the district will seek public input on the water supply plan in the coming weeks, we would encourage water managers to strive to implement a serious, long-term conservation program. Water storage and aquifer recharge are also methods that are environmentally and consumer friendly. 

    Tapping into our surface waters, though, should be a last resort undefined although because it is easy and relatively cheap, it tends to be the first resort. 

    The Ocklawaha and the St. Johns rivers are both struggling against reduced flow and pollution, and tapping them for tens of millions of gallons a day should be done only after exhaustive study, if then. 

    We are pleased the St. Johns district is addressing this problem. As we said at the outset, this is hardly a new reality undefined water experts and environmentalists, indeed everyday Floridians, have been warning about our growing population raining our water supply for more than a generation. 

    In light of that, St. Johns officials, and Executive Director Hans Tanzler specifically, need to send a message that the district is serious about taking meaningful steps to assure our water supply this time. 

    Frankly, we have seen untold numbers of reports from the district in the past warning about this very thing, only to have the district put the issue on the back burner for another day. 

    Since the 1970s, when St. Johns and Florida’s four other water management district were created, visionaries have warned of the day when we could not meet our water needs. Well, that day is coming and quickly. 

    We urge St. Johns officials to keep their eye on the ball and start addressing the problem by implementing a conservation program that all citizens can contribute to. That is the place to start. 


  • Thursday, January 02, 2014 10:12 AM | Deleted user
    http://www.imagechaser.blogspot.com/

    Click the link above to view the beautiful photography taken by Jim Nichols! 
    Let us know what you think of the look and feel of the Silver River!
  • Monday, December 30, 2013 10:36 AM | Deleted user
    http://www.ocala.com/article/20131227/OPINION01/131229763/1008/OPINION?Title=Editorial-A-hotel-at-Silver-Springs

    The article above is in today's "opinion" tab on Ocala.com, What do you think? Should there be a Hotel/Lodge at Sliver Springs Park? How much development to you think should happen at Silver Springs Park? We welcome your opinions!!
  • Monday, December 30, 2013 10:15 AM | Deleted user
    The Director's opening statement is amusing. Proud to announce the EPA will, one way or another, withdraw it's position on Numeric Nutrient Criteria. Yeah for States Rights! If this sets the tone for the rest of the "Newsletter", I'm not impressed.
    From what I've seen locally on DOACS' oversight of Best Management Practices, it's fairly roughshod oversight. Big Ag is to be trusted to comply?
    Has anybody noticed, the Springs are getting greener?
    I say publish the Ag Newsletter and hope the hundred readers can decipher the truth.
    Whitey

  • Saturday, December 28, 2013 5:37 PM | Deleted user
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGeXdv-uPaw

    Click the link above to watch the video. Very powerful!!
  • Monday, December 23, 2013 8:48 PM | Deleted user

    Florida water issues made waves in 2013 

    By Joe Callahan
     

    Staff writer

    T
    he discussion about Florida water has been a contentious one for decades undefined a war of words between environmentalists and developers over the effects of growth on the state’s underground aquifer.
    The issue continued making news in 2013, especially as the St. Johns River Water Management District continued studying a controversial waterdraw request from the Adena Springs cattle ranch.
    Water is the Star-Banner’s pick for the No. 10 local story of 2013. About 20
     newsroom employees ranked the top local stories of the year for 2013, and the paper will count down the Top 10 through Dec. 31.
    Adena wants to draw 5.3 million gallons of water per day for agricultural and livestock uses. The request is still under review.
    Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Herschel Vinyard visited Ocala in the fall and
     declared this area “ground zero” in the effort to save springs.
    Later in the year, the Star-Banner and The Gainesville Sun took an expansive look at the area’s springs and all that precious water bubbling to the surface.
    The newspapers’ series, “Fragile Springs,” looked at the area’s 12 major springs and the dangers these wonders face, especially reduced flow and skyrocketing pollution levels.






    Vanguard High School teacher John Hare shows a bottle of water collected at the Silver River. 

    DOUG ENGLE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/FILE
     

  • Monday, December 23, 2013 8:08 PM | Deleted user

    The Office of Agricultural Water Policy at the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has begun a twice-yearly newsletter with informational items on water quality, water conservation, and water supply issues as they pertain to agriculture in the state.  They have asked us to share with you the most recent newsletter (copy and paste link below into your browser).  If you would like to receive future newsletters directly by e-mail, please send your request to:  AgBMPHelp@FreshFromFlorida.com

     

    https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=dd62e13e4b&view=att&th=14321af355141591&attid=0.1&disp=inline&safe=1&zw


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Mailing Address: P.O. Box 153, Silver Springs, FL 34489-0153

Email Address: SilverSpringsAlliance@gmail.com



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